When my husband told me we’d been invited to his childhood best friend’s wedding in Portland, Oregon, my first thought was about what cemeteries I’d visit. It’s a cemetery hopper’s first instinct.

We only had a weekend so I quickly settled on Lone Fir Cemetery, the jewel in the crown of the 14 cemeteries managed by Metro (the regional governmental agency for the Portland metro area).

I can safely say that Lone Fir is just as quirky as the town it’s located in. And in a good way.

Lone Fir Pioneer Cemetery is one of 14 historic Portland cemeteries managed by Metro.

Lone Fir Cemetery is one of 14 historic Portland cemeteries managed by Metro.

Located in Southeast Portland, the 30 acres that make up Lone Fir are well tended. Much of that is due to the Friends of Lone Fir Cemetery, a group dedicated to education, preservation and restoration efforts. They not only give monthly tours but hold special events such as headstone cleaning workshops and a Halloween Tour of Untimely Departures.

Every Halloween, the Friends of Lone Fir host their Halloween Tour of Untimely Departures. Photo courtesy of Friends of Lone Fir Cemetery.

Every Halloween, the Friends of Lone Fir host their Halloween Tour of Untimely Departures. Photo courtesy of Friends of Lone Fir Cemetery.

According to Friends of Lone Fir’s web site, the cemetery’s first human occupant was Emmor Stephens. His burial was in 1846 in what was then privately owned land, which was later platted as Mount Crawford Cemetery in 1855. Then, Portland existed only on the west side of the Willamette River. Because of the marshy ground, several city graveyards were closed and many bodies were then re-interred at Mount Crawford.

This is the monument for James and Elizabeth Stephens. James was the son of Emmor Simmons, who is noted for being the first person buried in Lone Fir Cemetery when it was known as Mount Crawford Cemetery.

This is the monument for James and Elizabeth Stephens. James was the son of Emmor Stephens, noted for being the first person buried in Lone Fir Cemetery when it was known as Mount Crawford Cemetery.

Mount Crawford was renamed Lone Fir in 1866, for the once solitary tree in its northwest corner. Lone Fir is Portland’s oldest continuously used cemetery and is now a de facto arboretum, with 500 trees representing 67 species. More than 25,000 people are buried there.

Lone Fir definitely has some varieties of trees that I had never seen before.

Lone Fir definitely has some varieties of trees that I had never seen before.

Did you spot the squirrel on the side of the one on the far right?

Did you spot the squirrel on the side of the tree on the far right?

Photo courtesy of Chris Rylands.

Photo courtesy of Chris Rylands.

Reflective of the real trees is the large number of Woodman of the World tree-shaped monuments sprinkled throughout the cemetery. You’ve probably seen them before but never knew what they were. The symbol of the cut tree signifies a life cut short.

Woodmen of the World is a fraternal benefit society based in Omaha, Neb. that operates a large privately held insurance company for members. Many years ago, if you had a policy, the WOW provided a monument upon your demise.

Woodman of the World is a fraternal benefit society based in Omaha, Nebraska that operates a large privately-held insurance company for members. Many years ago, if you had a policy, the WOW provided a monument upon your demise.

In its early days, Woodman of the World insurance policies provided a death and monument benefit. That means they provided gravestones to members for free and later for those who bought a $100 rider.

In the 1920s, the Society stopped doing this when the costs got to be too great and some cemeteries began to not allow above-ground markers for maintenance reasons. But for several years after that, members and lodges arranged for markers and monuments on their own.

Another elaborate example of a Woodmen of the World monument.

Another elaborate example of a Woodman of the World monument.

Lone Fir also has many examples of one of my favorite type of monument, white bronze. In reality, white bronze is actually zinc. If you tap one, you can hear a hollow metallic sound. I could do an entire blog piece on this style of monument alone but for now, visit A Grave Interest to learn more about these hardy markers.

A common decorative motif on white bronze monuments is the sheaf of wheat. It can be a symbol of the Body of Christ. It  can also represent a long life, usually more than 70 years.

A common decorative motif on white bronze monuments is the sheaf of wheat. It can be a symbol of the Body of Christ. It can also represent a long life, usually more than 70 years. This gentlemen was 73 when he died.

A native of Germany, Lorenz Bonhert arrived in  the U.S. in April 1847 and soon after became a member of the Fourth Regiment of the Ohio Volunteers. who fought in the Mexican War.

A native of Germany, Lorenz Bonhert arrived in the U.S. in April 1847 and soon after became a member of the Fourth Regiment of the Ohio Volunteers, which fought in the Mexican War. It is unknown what brought him all the way to Oregon.

George Mutschler, a native of Germany, was a saloon keeper in Portland.

George Mutschler, a native of Germany, was a saloon keeper in Portland.

Later, I had the pleasure of encountering a fellow Find a Grave volunteer who also happens to be a Friends of Lone Fir member. She was washing a gravestone to get a better idea of the woman’s name. I rarely meet fellow Find a Grave members in person so it was a treat to do so that far away from home!

Linda was very helpful in explaining the history of the cemetery since she’s also a tour guide. She talked about the large open corner of the cemetery that is devoid of trees or markers, known as Block 14.

This unassuming plot has a great deal of history. At one time, it was not only where the Chinese workers who had come East to work on the railroad and in the mines were once buried but also patients of the former Oregon Hospital for the Insane.

This empty lot once held the graves of Chinese immigrants and mental hospital patients. Plans are in the works for a memorial garden to be constructed to remember them.

This empty lot once held the graves of Chinese immigrants and mental hospital patients. Plans are in the works for a memorial garden to be constructed to remember them.

According to Chinese custom, immigrants were buried here for a short time, with their remains later dug up and returned to China, to be reunited with their ancestors. This went on until Multnomah County (the land’s owner) wanted to use it as a maintenance building/yard for the highway department. In 1948, this block was excavated with a bulldozer. All remains found were packed off to China and the building was built shortly thereafter.

In 2004, Multnomah County made plans to raze the maintenance building on the land and sell the property to the highest bidder (mostly likely for condos). Many locals who knew the history of that space fought the move.

Ground-penetrating radar showed that two graves were still buried on the property, which meant it was still very much a cemetery. While the building was razed as planned, the land was deeded to Metro to be part of Lone Fir as a historic landmark. Plans are now in the works to turn it into a memorial garden to remember those who were originally buried here.

Scattered throughout the cemetery are these recent graves of Russian immigrants. The laser etched markers seem at home among the much older markers.

Scattered throughout the cemetery are these recent graves of Russian immigrants. The laser-etched markers seem at home among the much older markers.

Linda also told us about the striking black monuments with recent dates on them. Portland is home to a large Russian immigrant population. Some years ago, a few of the local Russian churches bought up a number of cemetery spaces at Lone Fir for their congregants to purchase.

When I saw these very life-like faces staring back at me, I almost felt as if I were in a different country. The Cyrillic print made it even more vivid. Most of the expressions are rather solemn. The one of an infant grave was incredibly poignant.

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At the same time, some of the modern markers I encountered were inventive and more lighthearted. The best example of this would have to be Joel Weinstein’s grave. A long-time publisher of a Portland magazine called Mississippi Mud, Joel was a huge fan of Puerto Rican art. His marker reflects his colorful life perfectly.

Joel Weinstein's gravestone was as unique as he was.

Joel Weinstein’s gravestone was as unique as he was.

Another eye-catching monument is the one for Dr. Minh Van Tran. I’m not sure if EJ and PJ Dragonhorn are the artists who created it.

I don't know anything about Dr. Tran but his gravestone is definitely different.

I don’t know anything about Dr. Tran but his gravestone is definitely different.

The last example I will share is a sad story in that what was once a beautiful monument has been vandalized to the point it’s now a shadow of what it was once intended to be.

I had seen Paul Lind's amazing monument online a few years ago. This photo was taken by someone else and shows how vibrant it was.

I had seen Paul Lind’s amazing monument online a few years ago. This photo was taken by someone else and shows how vibrant it was.

Paul Lind loved to play Scrabble. He died at the young age of 31. His fiance, Heather, wanted to create a monument that reflected his personality. Along with Paul’s father, she came up with this. She said, “He was a big time scrabble fanatic. I never was able to beat him on one-on-one.”

Unfortunately, by the time I was able to see it, vandals had torn the colorful tiles off to leave the shell behind. I read an article that said a Scrabble tournament was held in 2013 to raise funds to help restore it to its former glory but that hasn’t happened yet.

This is what remains of Paul Lind's once stunning marker.

This is what remains of Paul Lind’s once stunning marker.

One thing I noticed while we were there is that Lone Fir, in some ways like Oakland in Atlanta, is regarded as a valuable greenspace that many locals use. We saw several joggers. Linda said that the nearby high school’s track team uses the cemetery for running practice during the week.

IMG_5222Another bit of information she passed along to me is that in some cases, when students are given detention at the high school, they must draw from a jar containing the names of selected people buried at Lone Fir. The student then researches that person and write up a report about them. That’s certainly different!

As always, visiting cemeteries in a different state opens my eyes to the variety of grave stones, wildlife, and flora/fauna that exists outside my small world of Atlanta, Ga. Lone Fir provides that in spades, probably more than most cemeteries do.

I’d like to come back and see it again some day.

IMG_5315LoneFirbird

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