Photos

Monument to Mollie Cash Neal (right) and her daughter, Mary Elizabeth Neal (left), in Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.

Monument to Mollie Cash Neal (right) and her daughter, Mary Elizabeth Neal (left), in Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.

These "pillow" grave markers at Oakland Cemetery are a Victorian symbol for eternal rest.

These “pillow” grave markers at Oakland Cemetery are a Victorian symbol for eternal rest.

I found this unique-looking grave at Old Greencastle Cemetery in Dayton, Ohio. Only the word “Father” can be seen, no name is discernible on it. Maybe the person it was for built houses?

This is a beautiful statue in Mount Paran Baptist Church Cemetery that sits atop a “tree” carved out of stone.

Here's the back of it.

Here’s the back of it. The wood symbolizes a life cut short.

Statue on top of a mausoleum in Crestview Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.

Statue on top of a mausoleum in Crestlawn Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.

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That’s quite a view of the city on a cloudy day.

At Westview Cemetery in Southwest Atlanta.

This unique pyramid-shaped tomb Is located at Magnolia Cemetery in Charleston, S.C. Few of this kind of tomb exist in the South.

This unique pyramid-shaped tomb Is located at Magnolia Cemetery in Charleston, S.C. Few of this kind of tomb exist in the South.

This is difficult to read but it says: "Remember Man as You Pass By, As you ar (sic) now, So Once Was i, As I am Now so Shall You Be, Therefore Prepare to Follow Me."

This is difficult to read but it says: “Remember Man as You Pass By, As you ar now, So Once Was i, As I am Now so Shall You Be, Therefore Prepare to Follow Me.”

This epitaph was used first by Irish comedian/musician Spike Milligan, who said, "I Told You I Was Ill" should be his epitaph. If you look at his gravestone, it's not there.

Kind of says it all.

I found this on a tree next to Wesley Chapel Methodist Church Cemetery near Trion, Georgia. This is the first time I’ve seen a sign like this. I think Bill would be an interesting fellow to talk to!

Ryan2

The intricate design of the stained glass panel inside the tomb is indicative of the late 1800s and turn of the century arts.

The intricate design of the stained glass panel inside the bomb is indicative of the late 1800s and turn of the century arts.

The top of Thomas Pool's headstone reads: "Yesterday for Me and To Day for Thee".

The top of Thomas Pool’s headstone reads: “Yesterday for Me and To Day for Thee”. Located in St. Philips’s Church Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.

More to come!

7 thoughts on “Photos”

  1. I absolutely love these photos! The artistry and the variation of the statues and the monuments is fascinating. Really great stuff. Thanks for sharing and keep them coming….

  2. Eric Brantley said:

    This is a great idea!! Love looking at the unique stones. Did you see all of those at Myrtle Hill in Rome when you were up this way?

  3. Beautiful pictures. Im a cemetery hopper too.

  4. Beautiful! I love visiting all cemeteries. Still searching for my Andrew ancestors, especially Burley Andrew (2nd great grand father; Athens/Elberton areas).
    Loved your article in The Georgia Magazine.

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